What Do I Do if I Acquire Assets I Want To Protect After We Get Married?

Usually, if someone has personal assets, such as stock options or an inheritance, they have to come to an agreement with their soon-to-be spouse to sign a prenup, which details the separation of marital assets in the event of a divorce. The term “protect” is used in the sense that by signing a prenup, you can protect your assets from being considered marital, thus ensuring they are not available for distribution upon divorce.

Is it too late if we are already married?

In some cases, a person may not acquire assets that they consider are worth protecting until, for example, 8 months into the divorce. At this point, you are no longer able to draft a prenup, as that is an instrument only available before the marriage. In this instance the couple would require a postnup, which achieves the same goal as a prenup, it is just signed after the individuals have married.

Enforceability and Disclosure of a Postnup

Something important to keep in mind is that full and fair disclosure is an important part of a valid and enforceable postnup. When each party enters into the agreement, they both must completely disclose to the other party of their assets, liabilities, and income. This should also include assets you are reasonably aware you will be acquiring in the near future, such as the situation listed above. If the information that one of the spouses provided was not transparent, the agreement will not be enforceable when the time comes to get divorced.

Alternate Reasons

Postnuptial agreements are sometimes made in reaction to an event or pattern of behavior after the initiation of marriage, that gives cause to creating a plan for divorce. Excessive gambling, drug or alcohol abuse and financial hardship are common catalysts for spouses hiring attorneys to draft postnups, but as stated before, it does not always have to be in reaction to a negative event.

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