Archive for April, 2019

Who Pays for Health Insurance in the Event of a Divorce?

Wednesday, April 17th, 2019

If you and your spouse are on the same health insurance plan it is possible you may lose this insurance, since a person’s ability to get health insurance through your spouse is often predicated on the fact that you are married. In the event that this is the case, it doesn’t always mean that your spouse will no longer have to include you in their health care coverage. In the state of New York, under the Domestic Relations Law, section 236(B), the court has the ability to intervene. In certain instances, a court will issue an order that a party must not only purchase their former spouse a policy of insurance but also maintain that policy. This can be the case in regards to providing benefits for health, hospital care, and the like.

While the court does have this power and exercises it regularly, the “maintaining” of the insurance is not for an indefinite period of time. There is a limitation for how long a court can require an individual to cover the health insurance of their former spouse. This duration is set forth by the court during the divorce, and by law, this duration of time cannot exceed the length of time that spousal support (maintenance), or child support payments have been ordered.

If you are required to pay for your former spouse’s health insurance, COBRA is a plan that has been utilized by many and is a good option for you to obtain the needed benefits. It should be noted that in the state of New York if you are to be not eligible for COBRA benefits, for any reason, this alone will not be enough to be relieved from your court-appointed obligation to your former spouse.

However, a court can just as easily rule that both parties must be responsible for their own health care coverage. In this case, neither party would be obligated to cover the other’s health insurance. Mitigating factors such as income and children can also play a role in whether or not a court will order health care coverage.

Am I Required to Disclose Everything in a Prenup?

Wednesday, April 10th, 2019

A prenuptial agreement is a good tool to use to avoid a lengthy and costly divorce later. Of course, no one plans on getting divorced before they even get married, but if you have valuable assets or plan on acquiring ones, and you don’t want to risk losing them in the event of a divorce, a prenup is something to consider. However, many are under the wrong impression that the finalization of a prenup is a simple signing of a contract. In reality, before a prenuptial agreement can be approved, both parties must complete a financial disclosure statement, identifying all of their assets and debts. The parties will be viewed to have a confidential relationship which brings with it the duty to disclose, mutually attributed to each party.

A lack of complete disclosure may result in the parties’ agreement being invalidated., especially where there is an obvious inequity between the parties’ assets. A big part of the court approving a prenup is if they consider it to be fair to both parties. In order to avoid any potential issues, later on, full disclosure must be in writing. Each party should draft a financial disclosure affidavit, which will be attached to the prenuptial agreement as an addendum. This schedule should clearly demarcate, and thereby disclose, all of the party’s assets to the other. There should be a listing of the party’s assets, along with how much it is valued; any current outstanding liabilities, the amount/sources of the party’s income, any interests in businesses, partnerships, and any expectations of inheritances or gaining of another asset.

After this, the party’s will review and sign the section of the agreement that states that both parties have read each other’s financial disclosure affidavits, understand it, acknowledge reading it, and have had the opportunity to consult with their attorney about it prior to signing. This protects both parties from the other claiming they never had the chance to review or look over the documents. However, it is important to keep in mind that in the event you are getting a divorce, if you can prove your spouse did not fully disclose their income or assets at the time you signed the prenup, you may have grounds to have the agreement thrown out.

What to Do if You File Jointly but are Getting Divorced

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2019

Until a divorce decree becomes final, you and your spouse have the option of filing as “married joint” or “married separate”, both of which have positives and negatives that will be explored in this article. One thing to remember is whatever your marital status is as of December 31, is what will be reflected in your taxes.

If you are unable to file a joint return, you can file as head of household, which has benefits in itself, but that would only be permissible if you have a dependent living with you for more than half the year, and you paid for more than half of the maintenance for your home. Your filing status influences your tax rate and determines which credits you can claim. Filing together can result in a lower tax bill as opposed to filing separately, so the IRS has recommended calculating your tax liability as single and joint filers to learn which offers you both the most savings from the options available.

Filing jointly could have risks as well, since you now share the responsibility for any taxes due, along with associated penalties and any accrued interest. That means if your estranged spouse skips out on his or her taxes, it is now you who is responsible for paying them. Additionally, the IRS may or may not relieve you from your partner’s tax debts, depending on the investigation.

Because it is known that sometimes your tax burden can be lower by filing jointly, depending on your specific incomes, deductions, and credits, filing status can be used as a negotiating tool, because, in most scenarios, both spouses must agree to file a joint return. However, a court will not order unwilling spouses to file a joint return. In rare circumstances, the IRS will accept a joint return signed by only one spouse, but you would have to consult with a tax attorney to go about this particular filing process.